BAR asks: Should We Take Creation Stories Literally?

My answer to that question is, YES. But ALSO we can take them figuratively and symbolically.  The creation stories are rich with numinous inspiring symbolisms, esoteric nuggets. But to some extent there was a literal creation. It’s a BOTH / AND spiritual question, my friends, not an EITHER / OR.

Just like the question, “Was Jesus an historical character, or was he a mythical-spiritual character used for wisdom-teaching,” — the answer is BOTH / AND. Yes, and YES.  Anyway, interesting articles this week (below). Check out Biblical Archaeology’s new streaming TV channel! Wonder if we can get it on our Roku….

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Bible History Daily
June 5, 2017
Feature

Should We Take Creation Stories Literally?

Finding multiple truths in Biblical myths

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Were the creation stories in Genesis meant to be taken literally? Maybe not, says Biblical scholar Shawna Dolansky of Carleton University in Biblical Archaeology Review. Creation stories in Genesis were etiological, Dolansky and other scholars argue. That is, the creation stories in Genesis served to provide answers to why the world was the way it was, such as why people wear clothes and why women experience pain during childbirth.
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In the free eBook Exploring Genesis: The Bible’s Ancient Traditions in Context, discover the cultural contexts for many of Israel’s earliest traditions. Explore Mesopotamian creation myths, Joseph’s relationship with Egyptian temple practices and three different takes on the location of Ur of the Chaldees, the birthplace of Abraham.


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In Case You Missed It

How the Serpent Became Satan

Adam, Eve and the serpent in the Garden of Eden

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The serpent of Eden is portrayed as just that: a serpent. The story in Genesis 2–3 contains no hint that he embodies the devil, Satan or any other evil power. So where does the devil come into the details of Eden? In a guest post, Shawna Dolansky examines how the serpent became Satan. “The worldview of Jewish readers of Genesis 2–3 profoundly changed in the centuries since the story was first written,” writes Dolansky.
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Biblical archaeology is a fascinating journey toward understanding human history, culture and religion. Let Biblical Archaeology Review be your guide. Subscribe to BAR and enjoy six lavishly-illustrated issues that are destined to become treasures in your personal reference library.


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In Case You Missed It

Daily Life in Ancient Israel

What was life like during the time of the Biblical Judges?

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What was life like for the tribes of Israel in the time of the Biblical Judges, the period archaeologists call Iron Age I (1200–1000 B.C.E.)? The evidence for the early Israelite settlers of Canaan comes from two sources: archaeological survey and excavations. Much of the area of the central highlands, where most of the settlers of Canaan established their villages, was archaeologically surveyed in the 1980s and 1990s.
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Discover cutting-edge insights of top Biblical scholars and archaeologists with our new streaming video site! Renowned experts masterfully illuminate popular and controversial topics and bring to life ancient texts, characters and places. Stream videos straight from your own computer, or download to view them on the go. To celebrate the launch of this site, BAS is offering an initial 75% off!


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Published by

Katia

Katia is a consecrated independent sacramental bishop. She directs the online Esoteric Mystery School and Interfaith Theological Seminary. Check it out at NorthernWay.org.

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